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20110301
20110331
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
. at the same time, the united states began evacuating americans from japan and u.s. officials reminded those staying behind to get out of that 50-mile danger zone around the fukushima dai-ichi plant. the reactors damaged by friday's earthquake and tsunami were bombarded today with water mr. from helicopters, police water cannons and fire trucks to try to cool them off and prevent a meltdown, but it's not at all clear if it's working. and in washington, the head of the nuclear regulatory commission said it could take weeks to get these reactors under control. bill whitaker in japan begins our coverage. >> reporter: this new video released today gives the clearest picture yet of the stricken fukushima dai-ichi nuclear power plant. >> what we're seeing is that the damage from the fires is very significant. >> reporter: today, japanese military helicopters with protective led-lined cockpits dumped water on reactor three, attempting to cool the nuclear fuel rods. but much of the water appeared to disperse in the wind. police and firefighters also brought in water cannons to douse the reactor but
but not u.s. a top qaddafi insider who defected and his connection to pan am flight 103. i'm erica hill. also tonight, milk in the u.s. now showing traces of radiation from japan. what authorities are doing to keep you safe. why did plants that bury nuclear waste inside nevada's yucca mountain get killed? was it safety fears or politics? and the sweet taste of success. they owe their lottery jackpot to a candy bar. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> hill: good evening. katie is off tonight. muammar qaddafi's inner circle continues to shrink. first, his foreign minister defected last night. and then today, his u.n. ambassador quit while in egypt. just the same, qaddafi's military, though decimated by allied air strikes, is still pounding rebel forces. driving them further east away from key oil towns. one rebel leader compared qaddafi to a wounded animal, one that's more dangerous than a healthy one, which once again raises the question-- just what should the u.s. do moving forward? david martin b
's more dangerous than a healthy one, which once again raises the question-- just what should the u.s. do moving forward? david martin begins our coverage. >> reporter: there may be no american troops on the ground, but c.i.a. officers are operating inside libya. among other things, they picked up a member of the air crew of that american jet which crashed last week. their primary goal is to find out who the rebels are and what they need, but defense secretary gates today threw cold water on the idea that the u.s. is about to start arming or training the rebels. >> there are many countries that can do that. that's not a unique capability for the united states, and as far as i'm concerned, somebody else should do that. >> reporter: but gates clearly thinks somebody, perhaps an arab country, should. >> the opposition needs as much as anything right now is some training, some command and control, and some organization. it's a pretty-- it's pretty much a pickup ballgame at this point. >> reporter: testifying on the day nato took command of the operation, gates said the u.s. would start pullin
the table, including imposing a no-fly zone which would ground libya's air force. today the u.s. moved a destroyer and a marine amphibious task force closer to libya, and the treasury said at least $30 billion in libyan assets have been frozen. in spite of all that and with much of libya in opposition hands, qaddafi still refuses to leave, telling abc "all my people love me." we have a team of correspondents in the region. first, kelly cobiella in tripoli >> reporter: for the second time, a funeral in this eastern suburb of tripoli turned into a protest. people here claimed qaddafi's gunmen killed five of their neighbors during demonstrations last friday. what you don't see are qaddafi's security forces, as they arrived shooting their guns in the air foreign journalists were forced to leave. a cell phone camera caught this battle 125 miles from the capital in the city of misurata. qaddafi's men have been trying to retake an airfield and ammunitions depot for days and still haven't won. closer to the capital, just 30 miles to the west, anti- government protestors are holding the oil ref
ruled yemen for 32 years. he is a key u.s. ally in the fight against al qaeda. meanwhile, president obama plans to speak to the nation monday night about libya to explain why he ordered u.s. military action and give an update on the operation. today french and british jets struck libyan artillery and tanks near ajdabiya. smoke could be seen miles away. late today, rebels began a new push to retake the city. and libyan state television showed damage from overnight air strikes in tripoli. nato, which is taking over control of enforcing the no-fly zone, said it's planning for a mission that would last three months. as other nations play a larger role, the u.s. is publicly taking a step back, but it's a small step. more on that from david martin at the pentagon. >> reporter: this is what the battle for libya looks like to a pilot. it's a british pilot attacking a libyan tank. but more than half the 96 strike missions in the past 24 hours were american. and so were all 16 of the tomahawk cruise missiles fired overnight. despite the announcement that nato would soon be taking command of t
that could cost him his job. a federal agent tells cbs news he was ordered to let guns from the u.s. make their way to mexican drug cartels. i'm katie couric. also tonight, president obama's message to qaddafi. >> the violence must stop. moammar qaddafi has lost the legitimacy to lead and he must leave. >> couric: with the threat of a lockout hanging over the players n.f.l. contract talks go into overtime. and sea otters under attack from sharks and something more mysterious. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. they are two presidents leading a war against a common enemy: mexican drug cartels. president obama welcomed mexico's president felipe calderon to the white house today and mr. obama said the two countries are making progress against drug gangs. >> to combat the southbound flow of guns and money we are screening all southbound rail cargo, seizing many more guns bound for mexico and we are putting more gunrunners behind bars. >> couric: but one of the men on the
their sites on qaddafi's hometown of surt. just the same, a top u.s. military official says the rebels are not a robust fighting force and their gains may not be permanent. mandy clark is with the rebels in ras lanuf. >> this could be the midwest decisive battle yet in libya's civil war. in the span of just 48 hours, the ragtag army of students, laborers and some soldiers once loyal to the regime are now threatening qaddafi's hometown. the push west would have been impossible without coalition air strikes that pounded qaddafi's tanks and troops and trapped rebels in ajdabiya. allied air raids forced the regime's army into full retreat, allowing the rebels to retake control of the key oil hubs of brega and ras lanuf. despite those gains, these men are moving cautiously. they want to avoid traps set by qaddafi's forces. the first push to tripoli ended here in bin jiwad. rebels, believing residents were on their side, were led into a deadly ambush. now they say they've learned from that costly mistake. rebels say they're now doing clearing operations. >> ( translated ): we have learned to
the tactic letting guns walk. in this case into the hands of criminals who would use them in mexico and the u.s. doddson's bosses say that never happened. now he's risking his job to go public. >> i'm boots on the ground here in phoenix and telling you we've been doing it everyday since i've been here. here i am. tell me i didn't do the things that i did. tell me you didn't order me to do the things i did. tell me it didn't happen. now you have a name on it, you have a face to put with it. here i am. someone. now tell me it didn't happen. >> reporter: agent doddson and other insiders say the gun-walking strategy was approved all the way to the justice department. the idea was to see where the guns ended up, build a big case and take down a major cartel and it was all kept secret from mexico. a.t.f. named the case "fast and furious." this surveillance video obtained by cbs news shows suspected drug cartel suppliers carrying boxes of weapons to their cars at a phoenix gun shop. those long boxes being loaded into the red car are a.k.-47 type assault rifles. >> reporter: so it turns out a.t.f. not
's problems alone, but they are important to us. they're problems worth solving. >> mitchell: i'm russ mitchell. also tonight, new fears in japan. highly radioactive water is leaking from the fukushima plant and plutonium has been found in the soil. plus, she preys on child couples. cbs news tracks down a con artist making thousands in an adoption scam. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> mitchell: good evening. welcome to a special western edition of the "cbs evening news." president obama made his case for military intervention in libya tonight, telling the american people he did it to prevent a massacre in benghazi. he said once again that u.s. involvement would be limited, with coalition allies taking over command of the operation. chip reid is at the white house tonight with more on the president's speech. chip, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, russ. the president said he refused to wait for images of slaughter and mass graves before taking action in libya. >> when our interests and
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)